A Matter of Transgression

by Lois Mackey
a play in one act

(Lights up Evening in Southside Community Center, the eve of Kamar Walker’s funeral, JOSEPHINE WALKER dressed in black with simple jewelry is seated on a chair facing the closed casket. A repast is taking place in an adjacent room where family, friends, and others are gathered.)

(ENTERS CHLOE and WANDA)

CHLOE

Mama. You’ve been sitting here for a while.

WANDA

Josie sweetie, come and look at all the food, folks really turned it out.

CHLOE

Seems like everyone in the hood knows how much Kamar loves peach cobbler.

WANDA

I counted at least six.

CHLOE

Kamar (Look at the casket, then sit by her mother and take her hand) he would have loved it.

JOSIE

It’s nice… so many think highly of my boy.

WANDA

I ain’t surprise one bit, everybody in Bronzeville know Kamar from thirty-eight street clear down to forty-seventh, how could anyone resist that big beautiful smile.

CHLOE

All those people came out to show my baby brother some love. They’re here for you, they know you are a good mother.

JOSIE

I failed him, baby.

CHLOE

That’s far from the truth.

WANDA

You just like me. We stepped up and was mama and daddy to our sons. When daddy didn’t show up, we kept it moving, we do what mamas do, we take care of our children. Boys don’t like listening to their mamas. They see us as soft. Boys don’t… don’t want to be soft. Those streets won’t let them. I’ve been in your shoes, you know that. And you were there for me. Now I’m here for you. And I’m telling you the might of them nasty mean streets can seem stronger than a mother’s love, but it ain’t. Sweetie, it ain’t. You loved that boy. And let me tell you, I seen how Kamar smiled at you. His face lit up like Christmas. And nobody going to convince that there’s a love a love stronger than the love of a son for his mother. Kamar loved you. Your son loved. Now we’re going to be joined at the hip, you and me. You got to eat something. Continue reading